Category Archives: Recipes

Crowberry Pie

Recipe for Crowberry Pie:

-Pastry for double-crust, 9 inch pie (unbaked)

-4 C crowberries

-2 Tbsp lemon juice

-1 C granulated sugar

-1/3 C flour

-1/8 tsp ground cloves

Line pan with pie crust. In a large mixing bowl combine crowberries, lemon juice, sugar, flour, and cloves; mix well and pour into unbaked pie shell.

Dampen edge of shell with water, add top crust and flute edge. Slit top of pie.

Bake at 425F for 10 minutes.

Reduce heat to 375F and bake for 30 minutes.

Remove and cool.

Yields 6-8 servings

Source

Blueberry Wine

This is an article about the uses of mainly Blueberries and their uses in the process of winemaking. The author, tells the story of John Tamburello, and how he got his start in winemaking as well as some of the berry conditions that influence the taste of the wine such as rainfall, size and insect populations. At the end he even goes over the various flavorings of the wines. Overall a very informative and inspiring read for those who wish to learn about winemaking.

Chiasson, B. 2016. Blue wine and berries. Available online: winemaking Accessed 21 Sep, 2016.

Show me the Yummy

Show me the yummy. July 22, 2016. Berry banana bread recipe. Available online: Recipe. Accessed September 21, 2016.

Blueberry muffin energy bites. Recipe. Accessed September 21, 2016.

CA Arizonaa

Blueberries,zucchini and lemon! Oh my!

So I decided to submit a recipe for my first blog post. I also decided to find something new online using ingredients that we all have in abundance in our gardens when the berries are likewise in abundance. It was a no brainer when I found this recipe using one of my top fruits blueberry and yummy zucchini. As I read this bakers little story that she included I noticed she did what i like doing as well when i find a wonderful recipe….add a frosting or glaze ;).
Can’t wait to make this and enjoy the deliciousness that I saw in the photos. RM Mat-Su Valley
I’m including the blueberry zucchini bread recipe that started it all submitted by Laura Moody

blueberry zucchini cake with lemon buttercream

  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 3 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 1/4 cups white sugar
  • 2 cups finely shredded and drained zucchini
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 pint fresh blueberries (you can reserve a few for garnish if so desired)

Lemon Buttercream

  • 1 cup butter, room temperature
  • 3 1/2 cups confectioners\’ sugar
  • 1 lemon, juice and zest of (about 2 tablespoons)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Prepare two 8-inch round cake pans.
  2. Grate a large zucchini (or two small zucchini) and place in a clean dish towel. Squeeze until most of the liquid comes out. You will want to have 2 total cups of shredded zucchini after it has been drained. Set aside.
  3. In a large bowl and using a hand mixer, beat together the eggs, oil, vanilla, and sugar. Fold in the zucchini.
  4. Slowly add in the flour, salt, baking powder, and baking soda. Gently fold in the blueberries. Divide batter evenly between prepared cake pans.
  5. Bake 35-40 minutes in the preheated oven, or until a knife inserted in the center of a cake comes out clean. Cool 20 minutes in pans, then turn out onto wire racks to cool completely.

Lemon Buttercream

  1. Combine butter, sugar and salt and beat till well combined.
  2. Add lemon juice and vanilla and continue to beat for another 3 to 5 minute or until creamy.
  3. Fold in zest (If you are piping this buttercream, I recommend leaving out the zest).
Amanda Rettke. 2014. Blueberry Zucchini Cake with Lemon Buttercream. Available online:

Blueberries and Pasta

I have never actually tried a berry recipe, I have always just made jelly, pies, or pancakes out of the berries that I harvested so finding a pasta recipe with blueberries was really interesting and I thought I would share it with you.

Eatingwell.com Chicken and Blueberry Pasta Salad

Original recipe yields 4 servings
The Ingredients-
1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breast, trimmed of fat
  • 8 ounces whole-wheat fusilli or radiatore
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 large shallot, thinly sliced
  • 1/3 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 1/3 cup crumbled feta cheese
  • 3 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 cup fresh blueberries
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated lime zest
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Preparation

  1. Place chicken in a skillet or saucepan and add enough water to cover; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low and simmer gently until cooked through and no longer pink in the middle, 10 to 12 minutes. Transfer the chicken to a cutting board to cool. Shred into bite-size strips.
  2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Cook pasta until just tender, about 9 minutes or according to package directions. Drain. Place in a large bowl.
  3. Meanwhile, place oil and shallot in a small skillet and cook over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, until softened and just beginning to brown, 2 to 5 minutes. Add broth, feta and lime juice and cook, stirring occasionally, until the feta begins to melt, 1 to 2 minutes.
  4. Add the chicken to the bowl with the pasta. Add the dressing, blueberries, thyme, lime zest and salt and toss until combined.
  • Make Ahead Tip: Add everything except the blueberries and dressing to the pasta salad. Cover and refrigerate pasta salad, blueberries and dressing separately for up to 1 day. Toss together just before serving.
Nutrition information
  • Serving size: about 1 1/2 cups
  • Per serving: 320 calories; 11 g fat(3 g sat); 5 g fiber; 34 g carbohydrates; 23 g protein; 29 mcg folate; 49 mg cholesterol; 5 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 82 IU vitamin A; 6 mg vitamin C; 68 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 244 mg sodium; 254 mg potassium
  • Nutrition Bonus: Magnesium (18% daily value)
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 2
  • Exchanges: 2 starch, 2 lean meat, 1 fat

Looking at the site more in depth, I found that it has alot of healthy choices as well as treats. I look forward to trying some of these recipies out in the near future.

 

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/251887/chicken-blueberry-pasta-salad/

High bush cranberry – ketchup

High bush Cranberry…..Ketchup?

I attended an extremely small K-8 grade school in Moose Pass, Alaska. When I was in probably 3rd or 4th grade our school went out high bush cranberry picking, most of the kids did not appreciate the berries because of their tartness, but that is when our teacher came up with this brilliant idea. All of the kids loved the smiley face “French Fries”, but we would always go through copious amounts of ketchup when we had them. So our teacher found a recipe to make ketchup out of high bush cranberries. The process for making the ketchup can be tedious, but it is very rewarding and you end up canning it, so it lasts! A very important factor for Alaskan lifestyle of living. Follow the site bellow to learn how to make this delicious twist on your favorite condiment. BE. Moose Pass
Beachcomber, A. 2012. Highbush Cranberry Ketchup. Available online:http://www.alaskafloatsmyboat.com/beachcombing/2012/12/14/highbush-cranberry-ketchup accessed 14 Sept. 2016.

Cranberry bread

f you couldn’t tell by now, I love baking as an outlet for my PTSD, so I will likely be sharing a lot of recipes that I enjoy using. One of my coworkers loves, and I mean, LOVES cranberry bread. In my search for good bread recipes, I found this little gem! I have made this several times for her, adding about 1tsp of vanilla extract, and about ¾ cup of chopped walnuts. She seems to love it, and my family does as well!

Spray, Ocean. n.d. Classic cranberry nut bread. Available online: http://www.oceanspray.com/Recipes/Corporate/Breads-Muffins/Classic-Cranberry-Nut-Bread.aspx. Accessed September 14, 2016.

Swedish lingonberries with meatballs

Being Swedish, meatballs and jam are almost as important as pickled herring in my family. I found this good recipe for Swedish Meatballs and Lingonberry sauce that is very similar to the one my grandmother brought with her from Stockholm when she moved to the United States. Granted, this recipe uses pre-made lingonberry jam, I would imagine that it would be even better with fresh-made jam! Here’s the link to the recipe, with instructions! Enjoy!  CA Arizona

Florence, Tyler. n.d. Swedish meatballs with lingonberry sauce. Available online: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/tyler-florence/swedish-meatballs-with-lingonberry-sauce-recipe.html. Accessed September 14, 2016.

Raspberry Jam

Berry Jam

During my time in Alaska I had a very healthy raspberry patch. As they are my all time favorite berry I canned quite a bit of jam to serve on everything…waffles in the morning, biscuits at night, and ice cream for dessert! I like to keep foods as healthy and simple as possible for my kids. The following link has a great step by step for making the same type of jam that I make for my family. CS

http://www.theyummylife.com/Berry_Jam

Lemons and blueberries!

Recipe: Lemon Blueberry Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting by Cooking Classy.
Citation:
Jaclyn. 2014. Lemon Blueberry Cake. Available online: http://www.cookingclassy.com/2014/05/lemon-blueberry-cake/.
Accessed 2 September, 2016.
Comments: I made this cake last week with fresh blueberries and it was delicious. Many friends who tried it, have asked for this recipe.  CZ Anchorage

Berry Picking with Kids

Growing up in Alaska has resulted in a life long love of eating fresh blueberries right off the bush. When I was young my mother and aunt would always take all the girls out berry picking for the weekend. Sometimes we would set up camp other times just day trips, each day filled with my cousins and I eating more berries than what made it into our buckets. We would hike out to my aunt’s most “secret” berry patches and spend hours picking berries and enjoying the serenity that comes with it. After we’d get home we’d spend more time cleaning out extra leaves and stems, rinsing and storing the berries for the winter, mostly just freezing them for fresh blueberry shakes.

Now I am the mother who is getting to enjoy the hours of berry picking while listening to my two little ones munching away instead of filling their buckets. There’s almost nothing more enjoyable than a weekend near my favorite creek picking and eating fresh blueberries. We will eat fresh berries with burnt marshmallows for a camp dessert, fresh chilled blues with eggs and bacon for breakfast and grilled steaks smothered in mashed berries. When we come home my daughter who is four is always excited to help clean and organize the berries for storage and she’s already learning how to make fresh blueberry pie. Teaching my children how to identify blueberries and harvest them without destroying the plants has been extremely rewarding not only in extra picking hands, but because they are always so excited about finding berries, returning to old berry patches and of course, how purple their mouths turn after a day of eating fresh blueberries.

My son’s favorite blueberry recipe other than simply eating them fresh has got to be the shakes I grew up on as a kid. It seems like he’s always asking for mommy to make shakes and so although super simple, that is the recipe I would like to share, a two year old can’t be wrong…

Alaskan Blueberry Shake:

fill the blender with frozen AK blueberries

pour in milk about 3/4 full

add about a cup of granulated sugar

about a teaspoon of ground cinnamon

and a dash or two of ground nutmeg

blend well and enjoy with a fun curly straw.

As you can tell we don’t exactly measure when we cook, but we mix according to our taste buds. This can be easily tweaked to fit your preferred tastes and to add a little kick try a dash of ground ginger or about a teaspoon of orange zest.  LH Fairbanks

Blueberry Yogurt, Smoothies, Yum!

Blueberry’s for breakfast–every day!
Almost every single morning, I eat alaskan blueberries, raspberries, with yogurt and/or kefir and home made granola. I’m a little addicted. I figure it’s my daily dose of anti-oxidants. I need about 10 gallons of blueberries to eat this–every morning. I used to mostly bake with blueberries–pies, muffins, ect., which of course are delectable, but what I like about eating blueberries this way is that you’re not also eating a lot of white sugar and flour. And of course they taste just fine without the addition of sugar and whatnot. I do make at least one blueberry pie every year, but by eating some, every day, I get my daily dose of anti-oxidants, as do my kids  If I were purely eating these for the antioxidant content though, I would add lingonberries in which have the highest amount of antioxidants according to the ORAC score (Holloway, Dinstel, and Leiner, 2006). But I think I’d need to add in some sugar then which might negate some of the benefits.  HR Fairbanks
Breakfast Recipe:
1/4 cup blueberries (slightly defrosted)
1/4 cup raspberries (slightly defrosted)
1 container sigis icelandic yogurt (high in protein)
1 dollop of kefir (mostly for the probiotics)
1/2 cup of granola
Mix together and enjoy.
Smoothie Recipe
Another way I love to eat blueberries is in a smoothie. In a vitamix, mix 1/2 cup of blueberries, 1/2 cup of raspberries, 1 banana, 1/2 cup of full fat yogurt, and maybe 1/4 cup of milk if it’s not blending too well. Frozen berries mean that you don’t need to add any ice to this mixture.
Patricia S. Holloway, P.S., R. Dinstel, & R. Leiner. 2006. Antioxidants in Alaska Wild berries. Georgeson Botanical Garden, Note No. 35.

Why I love Blueberries

Why I love wild blueberries

This was a decent berry year. I was able to pick nearly four gallons of blueberries which is very good considering the time it takes to travel to the best patches in this area. I love blueberries and when I cannot have wild ones I usually have a little carton of store bought berries in my fridge for my morning granola and yogurt or simply to snack on during the day. With my bumper crop of wild berries to use I have since made two pies and enjoyed many blueberry snacks. One thing that will never cease to amaze me is how incredible wild blueberries taste especially when compared to the rather bland flavor of store bought. The first pie I made using The Pioneer Woman recipe for perfect crust and a recipe I found in a cook book entitled Best of the Best from Alaska Cookbook. AB, Delta Junction

DOUBLE GOOD BLUEBERRY PIE
   Baked 9 inch pie shell
3/4 c. sugar
3 tbsp. corn starch
1/8 tsp. salt
1/4 c. water
4 c. blueberries
1 tbsp. butter
1 tbsp. lemon juice
Whipped cream (optional)
Combine sugar, corn starch and salt in saucepan. Add water and 2 cups blueberries. Cook over medium heat stirring constantly until mixture comes to a boil and is thickened and clear. (Will be quite thick.) Remove from heat and stir in butter and lemon juice. Cool.

Place remaining 2 cups of blueberries in pie shell. Top with cooked berry mixture. Chill. Garnish with whipped cream.

 

 

Juniper for Gin

Juniper “berries” are one of the main botanicals that give gin its distinctive flavor. The berries of juniper are actually cones that have modified scales giving it a smooth, berry-like appearance. There are many types of juniper, but common juniper (Juniperus communis) is the species most often used for flavoring gin. Have you ever wondered how your favorite gin companies harvest juniper? According to this site, the best juniper is still harvested from wild trees. There is a short video in the middle of the page that shows harvesters in action.

Honeyberry Buckle

Modified from King Arthur Flour Company. 2003. The King Arthur Flour Baker’s Companion. WW Norton & Co, New York.

Recipe:  Honeyberry Buckle (modified from a blueberry buckle recipe, ’cause “honeyberry buckle” is fun to say)

Batter:  3/4 cup sugar, 4 tbsp. butter, 1 large egg, 1/2 cup milk, 2 cup all-purpose flour, 1/2 tsp. salt, 1/4 tsp. each cinnamon and cardamom, 1 tsp. vanilla extract.  2 cups fresh honeyberries OR 2 cups frozen NOT thawed. (Add while still frozen, or the batter will turn an unpleasant pinky-purple color.)

Streusel:  1/2 cup sugar, 1/2 cup all-purpose flour, 1 tsp. cinnamon, 2 tsp. lemon zest, 1/2 tsp. salt, 5 tbsp. softened butter.

For the batter:  Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.  Cream the butter and sugar, then add egg and mix at medium speed for 1 minute.  Whisk the dry ingredients in a separate bowl.  Stir half the dry ingredients into the butter/egg mixture, then stir in the milk and vanilla.  Add the rest of the dry ingredients, then gently fold in honeyberries.  Spread the batter in a greased 9-inch square or 9-inch round pan.

For the streusel: In a small bowl, whisk the sugar, flour, cinnamon, lemon, and salt.  Add the butter and mix with a fork or your fingers to make medium-sized crumbs.  Spring the streusel evenly over the batter.

Bake:  45-50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.  Remove from the oven and cool in its pan on a rack.  Serve with coffee in the morning or with whipped cream or ice cream for dessert.

Drying lingonberries

Apparently pretreating lingonberries before drying them cracks the skins and helps the drying process. I was putting them directly in the dehydrator and wondering why they were taking so long to dry. Then after several days they were almost powdery. I am going to try this method next year and see if it works better. In addition to the drying tips there are a number of good guidelines here for storing your lingonberry harvest. Planning on printing this out because lingonberries are my favorite!   Drying lingonberries

Dried Lingonberries

I found this on the internet while looking for information about dried lingonberries. I was interested because I have tried to dry lingonberries but they came out very crunchy and powdery (which I know after watching the screencast is normal without added oil and sugar to make them chewy). I found this Finnish product and it came with some information about lingonberries and a short video on picking lingonberries.  Dried Lingonberries

Berry Fermentation

Fermented Berries The only way I’ve ever fermented berries was for wine.  It is possible to ferment them in a way that does not produce the alcohol content of wine and creates a highly nutritious food item.  The Nourished Kitchen has an article on fermenting berries: Fermented berries Cultures for Health sells starter cultures and if you sign up for their newsletter at the bottom of their website, they will send you a link to some really informative e-books.  Their free e-book on lactofermentation covers fruits and berries: https://www.culturesforhealth.com/cultured-food-expert-advice.

Berry growing tips and recipes

If you are ever driving trough Ottawa here is a farm to check out growing strawberries, raspberries and Saskatoons. They include recipes for each berry with their descriptions. Nice pictures.   Berry farm recipes

Serviceberry, saskatoon processing and recipes

A quick introduction to the Serviceberry from the UAF Cooperative extension.  Includes storage, preservation and recipes.   Serviceberry